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28th Systems Science Colloquium

Winter semester 2021/22

The colloquium takes place on Wednesdays from 16:15 to 17:45.

This semester, there is a mixture of onsite (Präsenz) and online colloquia.

  • Onsite colloquia take place in room 35/E16 (biology building, Barbarastraße 11). There are two options of participation: (a) onsite or (b) online via a live stream. In the latter case, please register in StudIP for Systemwissenschaftliches Kolloquium.
  • Online colloquia take place via a videoconference in BigBlueButton. The link will be announced. There are two options of participation: (a) online via the link of (b) onsite in room 35/E16 via a projection of the videoconference on a screen.

Please see the program below for which colloquia will be held on-site or online.

PDF file of the program for download

Program

01 December 2021, onsite

Prof. Dr. Björn Waske, Osnabrück University, Institute of Computer Science, Remote Sensing and Digital Image Analysis
Multisensor remote sensing and machine learning for monitoring spatial-temporal land use patterns

 

08 December 2021, onsite

Prof. Dr. Volker Grimm, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Ecological Modelling
Modeling honeybees under stress with BEEHAVE: Lessons for theory, practice and systems science

 

05 January 2022, online

Prof. Dr. Vrushali A. Bokil, Oregon State University (USA), Department of Mathematics
Optimal control of plant disease epidemics
Joint Mathematics and Systems Science Colloquium

 

12 January 2022, onsite

Prof. Dr. Ralf Schäfer, University of Koblenz-Landau, Institute for Environmental Sciences
The role of multiple stressors including toxicants in the loss of freshwater biodiversity

 

19 January 2022, onsite

Prof. Dr. Paul van den Brink, Wageningen University and Research (The Netherlands), Environmental Risk Assessment
Ecological risk assessment of chemicals: From book-keeping to chemical stress ecology

 

26 January 2022, online

Prof. Dr. María Alejandra Vélez, University of Los Andes (Colombia), Faculty of Economics
Have behavioral sciences delivered on their promise to influence environmental policy and conservation practice?

 

02 February 2022, tba.

Dr. Ulrike Schlägel, University of Potsdam, Institute of Biochemistry and Biology
Movement-mediated community assembly and coexistence

 

03 February 2022 (Thursday), onsite

Prof. Dr. Andreas Focks • PD Dr. Peter Viebahn
Antrittsvorlesungen (Titel tba.)

Abstracts of presentations

01 December 2021
Prof. Dr. Björn Waske, Osnabrück University, Institute of Computer Science, Remote Sensing and Digital Image Analysis

Multisensor remote sensing and machine learning for monitoring spatial-temporal land use patterns

The transformation of natural ecosystems, e.g. due to agriculture, deforestation and urbanization is one of the major drivers of global environmental change. Earth Observation (EO) systems provide spatially distributed and temporally frequent information on land use and land cover and became a valuable and powerful tool to monitor the Earth. However, the increased availability of different, often complementary EO data, the availability of massive open data archives and increasing performance requirements demand increasingly improving strategies for data analysis. Various developments and applications will be introduced to underline the potential of multisensor remote sensing imagery and machine learning for monitoring spatial-temporal land use patterns.

08 December 2021
Prof. Dr. Volker Grimm, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig

Modelling honey bees under stress with BEEHAVE: lessons for theory and practice

What drives the decline and collapse of honey bee colonies? Several individual stressors are discussed, such as pesticides, diseases, reduced land use diversity or beeking practices, but there is growing consensus that multiple stressors are responsible. Since it is impossible to study all combinations of stressors in controlled experiments, models are needed to integrate and focus empirical research. BEEHAVE (www.beehave-model.net) is the first model to integrate spatio-temporal forage supply in the landscape, foraging, energy and pollen budget, hive demography, diseases and beekeeping practices. I will present BEEHAVE and its purpose, its underlying rationale and past and future applications. I will also discuss how models for decision support should be designed and presented and why theory is necessary also for applications.

 

 

Archive: Previous Colloquia